Thyroid Problem in Dogs?

Is thyroid condition being diagnosed for dogs to often as a "cure all"? We took one dog a week ago and they said it was a thyroid problem, we took another dog yesterday and they diagonosed her with a thyroid problem. As we were leaving, we overheard another lady comming out of the examining room and the vet was telling her that her dog had a thyroid problem. Is this just a coincidence or has this become a vets exuse for all problems?

9 comments

  • Vet Tech ©

    The only way to diagnose a thyroid problem is through a blood panel, so vets are not making up the results. If the thyroid is overactive or under-active it will show the levels are not within normal limits.

    We are seeing many more thyroid issues to do poor breeding practices, obesity, and poor food brands.

  • itchianna

    My Yorkie has thyroid issues and the medication has made all the difference in the world. He is less sleepy, eats better and does not constantly scratch. He is much more love able and happy now that he is on his meds.

  • tejas_yuki

    Only a blood test can properly diagnose. Did your vet run a thyroid panel to test for thyroid disease? If not, your vet is assuming and you should find a new vet.

  • ‹Pömš 4 Lïfë›

    To determine a thyroid condition they need to draw blood. Check TSH, T3, T4. That will give you an answer as to whether your dogs have thyroid condition or not.

    To me the situation sounds kind of fishy…. I think you should take your dog to a new vet… Have the blood drawn that is the only way to know for sure your dog has a thyroid condition.

    Besides what symptoms of a thyroid condition is your dog showing???

  • avettech

    Was any lab done to confirm hypothyroidism as a diagnosis? If not I would either request lab work-ie a thyroid panel sent off to Michigan State University or find another vet. Do not put your dog on thyroid meds without a definite diagnosis if you do you will shut down your dogs functioning thyroid. Antech has a nice article on their website that discusses thyroid disease I don’t have the web addy but just type in hypothyroidism in dogs in a search engine.
    Hope this helps

  • Marrissa

    No, just because you have heard 2 Veterinarian’s tell you your dog has a thyroid problem and one to another lady on your way out doesnt mean they are telling EVERYONE their dog as a thyroid problem. It is a blood test that is preformed, if there wasnt one preformed then you need to see a different vet. But if there was, the vet isn’t lying. Alot of people’s animals have thyroid problems and they dont even know about it, mainly because they breed a bitch who is Hypo or Hyper and she passes it to the pups.

  • Golden gal©

    Pom4life is correct. With our blood work there is no way for a vet to tell if the dog has a thyroid problem. It’s the only way to properly not only diagnosis it but also to determine how much of the thyroid medication to give the dog .

    I would consult another vet and see what they say. sounds fishy to me too!

  • Loki Wolfchild

    Hypothyroidism is certainly becoming a major problem in dogs — I’ve had several diagnosed with it over the past decade. While I do think a lot of it is legitimate (and perhaps a response to all of the junk we feed them and environmental toxins dogs are exposed to), it can be a symptom of a larger problem.

    I recently had a dog die who was diagnosed as hypothyroid several years ago, but when the necropsy was done after his death, he apparently had Cushing’s disease and was misdiagnosed.

    As I said, a symptom of a larger problem. It’s up to your vet to be able to interpret the bloodwork correctly, and it’s up to you to research the disease and monitor you dog to make sure s/he is responding appropriately to the medication…if not, I’d look into more testing or a second opinion.

    ADD: Here’s the Antech thyroid article someone else mentioned:
    http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/THYROID-ASSESSING-FUNCTION.HTM

  • Karebear

    Like the others have said -blood work is the only way to know for sure. Although it is common in dogs, doyou know if they had blood work? did the vet give you meds for your dog to take? If it’s truely thyroid the dog will require meds. Did your dog have blood drawn? If not then I’d question how the vet diagnosed the dog.

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