red meat is linked to colon cancer, so are there a lot of people?

in Argentia who have colon cancer???

7 comments

  • Mary Boo

    The chances of you developing colon cancer are very slim, and there are many conditions which cause bleeding. If it is bleeding alone, without any cramping, pain, etc then the chances are even slimmer. HOWEVER, you do need to get in contact with a doctor and infact, since you have a first relative with colon cancer you should do regular colonoscopies (every year), there are pre-cancerous stages in the colon which can be detected with colonoscopies and that can prevent the cancer from happening all together. Best of luck.

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/fhg/updates/Red-meat-and-colon-cancer.shtml

  • essentiallysolo

    no, actually there are not. the so called link between red meat and colon cancer are tenuous at best. It is much more the lack of fiber, not the presence of meat that is the better explanation. Lack of adequate hydration and lack of fiber is the usual combo that they link to colon cancer, and also a family propensity for cancers of any kind.

  • tinkerbellie88

    My step father has cancer because of eating too much red meat but he isn’t from argentina…i guess it depends on who eats it and who doesnt…not from where your from.

  • lo_mcg

    A diet HIGH in red and processed meats is a risk factor for colon cancer.

    Most people who eat red meat don’t get colon cancer, and not everybody who gets colon cancer eats a lot of red meat.

    It’s a diet high in red and processed meat AND low in fibre, fruit, vegetables and folate that canreally increase your risk of colon cancer.

  • Obamas Shoes

    It’s not really the red meat that causes colon cancer, but lack of fiber from not eating non-meat. It’s been said that eating a bowl of oatmeal everyday is one of the best ways to pevent colon cancer.

    In Argentina, they eat a lot of fresh fruit which is high in fiber and they have a very long life expectancy given their income. In this study people had lower rates if they ate good foods and the amount of red meat did not make any difference:

    http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/112717678/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0
    Abstract
    A case-control study has been conducted to investigate the relationship between dietary components and risk of colon cancer in the La Plata area of Argentina. Cases are 110 patients newly diagnosed with colon cancer in 10 major hospitals between 1985 and 1986. Two neighbourhood controls per case were individually matched by age, sex and place of residence. Personal interviews elicited information on frequency of consumption of 140 food items during the 5-year period up to 6 months prior to interview. Risk is analyzed by quartiles of individual food items and groups of items. Multivariate conditional logistic regression modelling indicates that consumption of eggs is associated with increased risk for colon cancer (odds ratios by quartile: 1.0, 1.58, 2.02, 4.66), as are some dairy products (ORs of 1.93 for the highest quartile of consumption of cheese). Intake of vegetables, fish and poultry is associated with statistically significant decreasing risk (ORs of 0.075, 0.39 and 0.39, for the highest categories of consumption of vegetables, fish and poultry, respectively). The risk for red meat does not consistently increase as consumption increases. Risks are not altered by the inclusion of potential confounders such as education or body mass index. These findings confirm those of several previous studies and are of particular interest, since the Argentinean diet typically includes a high intake of red meat.

  • april

    The National Cancer Institute’s Rashmi Sinha (search) has a long history of trying to use weak statistics to convict meat of causing cancer. I first brought her antics to the attention of my FoxNews.com readers in a November 2000 column amid her crusade to link well-done meat with cancer.

    It appears that Dr. Sinha remains bent on using her position at the National Cancer Institute to scare us away from eating meat. She’s been at it since at least 1994, but with little to show except a stack of scary, but unsupported headlines — which in itself is somewhat revealing.

    If after all the time and effort Sinha has put into trying to link meat consumption with cancer, she still can’t do it, isn’t it time that the NCI reassign her to more productive work?

  • Beau.Gus

    Red meat is not "linked to colon cancer" any more than dieing is "linked to air travel"….

    Argentina consumes more beef per person than America, yet they have much lower colon cancer rates than Americans.

    http://www.alterni.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=92

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