Natural remedies for menstrual cramps during work?

I’m 25 and never had a job. I’m trying to find a job right now, but when that time of the month comes around I wonder what I would do if I had to work on the days I was menstruating, since right now I can just sit at home and deal with it in private and comfort of my home because I don’t have anywhere to be. I haven’t used tampons in over a year, and I don’t plan on ever using them again, and pads are horribly inefficient and dirty. I heard of the Diva Cup, and I want to get one of those. But what do I do about cramps? My cramps rarely get super bad, and I don’t always cramp with every period, but when I do cramp all I want to do is lay around and not move. I don’t like taking pain medications and prefer to deal with things in a natural, non-intrusive way. What could I do for cramps, if the occasion arises I have to deal with such, in a work environment? Some kind of tea? Some kind of mild exercise I could do in place while working at the same time, like with my abdomen or something? One of those heating pad things that stick to your body or wrap around and wear? A topical ointment or oil? Aromatherapy? Anything?

One comment

  • Jay-Jay

    Good that you’re considering a cup as they’ll help with cramps and make periods far easier to manage at work, but a quick note – don’t instantly go for Divacup as they’re a long firm cup so may not be suited to you. See this guide; How to Buy a Menstrual Cup – http://www.wikihow.com/Buy-a-Menstrual-Cup

    There are LOTS of ways to lessen or prevent cramps all together, a few suggestions…

    Diet – most important factor; small regular meals of foods rich in essential fatty acids, fresh veggies and fruits (bananas especially), lean proteins and whole grains. Avoid processed foods, simple starches like white breads, heavy dairy products, fatty meats, salt, caffeine, and refined sugars.

    Supplements – flaxseed (500mg 3 times p/d), vitamin B6 (100mg once p/d), magnesium (100mg every 2 hours during period), vitamin E in d-alpha tocopherol form (50mg 3 times p/d), vitamin C to balance hormones. Any of the above can be taken for an immediate effect on cramps, or simply get a good supplement to take daily to help prevent cramps.

    Herbal – herbal teas such as raspberry leaf, yarrow, lemon balm, black haw, chamomile, red raspberry, wild strawberry, valerian – from health stores, staff there can suggest other ideas too. Also help regulate your hormones by taking Evening Primrose oil, Black Cohosh capsules, or Chaste Tree tincture daily – these help a lot, you can get them from health stores and some supermarkets too.

    Painkillers – anti-inflammatory’s; Ibuprofen or Aspirin. Natural; cell salts every 5-10 minutes until pain stops. Non-pill; clary sage oil rubbed into stomach, which supports estrogen production. Ask your doctor for Mefenamic Acid which blocks syntheses of prostaglandin F2 alpha which causes cramps, take 3 times p/d for the first 4 days of your period.

    Exercise – anything to stretch abdomen and improve breathing, yoga is particularly good, this video shows postures for cramps – http://www.videojug.com/film/yoga-postures-for-menstrual-pain-relief – at work just focus on nice deep breaths and stretching subtly.

    Acupressure – a professional may be good (FYI chiropractic care may also help), but you can stimulate pressure points yourself easily at work, this video shows what points to use – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afYHM9y4lJY

    Attitude – we’re constantly bombarded with negative ideas about menstruation; awkward, painful, gross, etc. Really it’s none of these things, but if you believe otherwise then you’re going to be miserable during your period and this will affect you physically. Women with more positive attitudes to menstruation are more likely to find better ways to deal with periods and have easier periods.

    If all else fails – see a doctor.
    Cramps are common but not a normal part of menstruation, they could be a sign of a more serious underlying problem. Your doctor should run tests to rule out problems such as endometriosis, and offer appropriate treatment. Some doctors may attempt to prescribe birth control as a quick fix, this may stop cramps by suppressing your cycles, but it’s an extreme method given the possible side-effects as it effects your whole body. A doctor should always try to treat the underlying problem, not try to pass you off with birth control.

    Stamp Out Cramps (Without the Pill) – http://www.scarleteen.com/article/pink/stamp_out_cramps_without_the_pill

Leave a Reply