What is a good natural remedy for anxiety disorders?

I’ve pretty much been on and off meds my whole life since the age of six, among other things I’m diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and more recently I’m having anxiety related symptoms of depression. I recently opted to get back on Fluoxetine, but I hate the feeling of being drugged, and I kind of feel like it doesn’t really help with my anxiety, more like masks it. Makes me feel half asleep and wide awake at the same time, and makes it difficult to concentrate. Plus I’m concerned with what long term effects it may be having on my health, particularly reproductive. Can anyone recommend any legal, relatively safe alternatives, such as a herbal remedy? I just feel like there’s got to be something better out there, instead of the expensive, addictive crap that big pharma pushes.
I’ve gotten so many great suggestions that I will be researching/trying. Thank you so much for your help!

7 comments

  • ☮Jen D☮

    Bach’s Rescue Remedy
    Calcium 2000 mg daily – a natural tranquilizer
    Magnesium 600 mg daily – relieves tension, spasms, tics
    B-1 50mg 3 times daily – has a calming effect on the nerves.
    B-6 50mg 3 times daily – important in the production of certain brain chemicals.
    Zinc- 50 mg daily – can have a calming effect
    Chromium Picolinate – 200 mcg. daily – Chromium deficiency can produce symptoms of anxiety.

  • You mention ”big pharma” .herbals are a huge business & they dont work & they make outreageous claims & are also expensive!

  • jam_please

    Chamomile calms nerves. B-12 also does this, corn products have a lot of B-12/Niacin in them.

    Sounds like your body is also sensitive to pharmaceuticals. It would be a good idea for you to see an herbalist and study alternative therapies – legal ones.

    Zoda and others like him/her have probably misused the herbals or combined them with things that cancel them out.

    I am a big supporter of natural medicines because I am also sensitive to pharmaceuticals.

    Not the same issues, but similar.

  • David

    I have a lot of the issues you do right now. I have OCD, a social anxiety disorder, severe depression, and PTSD. Right now im currently on Fluxoetine and all it does is make me feel like a zombie so i can’t express emotion. It does nothing for my anxiety or depression. What I am going to try is a herbal supplement called Kava Kava. It is supposed to help a lot with anxiety and its supposed to be similar to alcohol in effects. Give it a try.

  • Dietary factors

    Caffeine consumption is one of the most common causes of anxiety. People who suffer from anxiety disorders tend to be unusually sensitive to the effects of caffeine, so even small amounts may cause problems for them. Withdrawing from caffeine can be difficult, as it usually results in severe headaches, lethargy, and other symptoms. I have learned, from a small series of cases, that caffeine-withdrawal headaches can be prevented by supplementing with Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) three times a day, beginning on the day of or the day before withdrawal, and continuing for a few days.

    Reactive hypoglycemia also appears to be an important cause of anxiety. (1) Hypoglycemia should be suspected in patients whose anxiety occurs or becomes worse before mealtime and is relieved by eating. Reactive hypoglycemia can be treated effectively by avoiding blood sugar-destabilizing foods (e.g., refined sugar, caffeine, and alcohol); eating small, frequent meals; and supplementing with chromium, B vitamins, magnesium, and other micro-nutrients.

    Food allergy may be a triggering factor for anxiety in some cases. (2) Allergy should be suspected if symptoms occur after eating or improve with fasting, or if a person has other manifestations of allergy, such as migraines, asthma, rhinitis, or irritable bowel syndrome. An elimination diet followed by individual food challenges can usually identify which foods are causing symptoms.

    Herbal Treatments

    Kava kava (Piper methysticum) has been shown in at least seven double-blind studies to be an effective treatment for anxiety. (6) Although kava kava was generally well tolerated in these studies, there have been rare reports of severe hepatotoxicity from the use of this herb. As a result, kava kava has been banned in some countries, although it is still available in the United States. Preliminary evidence suggests that the reported adverse effects were due to an idiosyncratic reaction, rather than to a toxic effect per se. Because there is no way at the present time to predict who might react to kava kava, people taking this herb should be alert for any early warning signs of hepatotoxicity, such as nausea, fatigue, dark urine, or right upper quadrant tenderness. Despite the rare but serious adverse reactions, kava kava appears to be better tolerated than benzodiazepines.

  • exercise.Seriously-going for at least a 35 minute walk or jog daily eases tension and anxiety.GOD-bless

  • Alex M

    melitonin helps alot because it calms you

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